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Welsh Pony & Cob - Ponies & Breeds



Welsh Pony & Cob displaying breed conformation.

Welsh Pony & Cob Article and Photos Copyrighted - see credits below

The genetic base for the Welsh Cob, is the same as for all Welsh pony types,the Welsh Mountain Pony, but the powerful Cob is the largest.

All Welsh pony and cob breeds derived from Medieval times, yet all developed from the original mountain pony and its outcrosses of eastern blood. All of the Welsh Pony and Cob breeds possess the hardiness that enables them to be kept out all the year round (one of the reasons why they make very suitable family ponies) ,their great trotting gait, and the spirited pony character that typifies the Welsh breeds.

The smallest and most ancient (Section A) is the Welsh Mountain Pony whose height does not exceed 12 hands. The color is predominantly gray, but bays and chestnuts also occur with notable palomino strains too.

The Welsh Pony (Section B) although larger than the Mountain Pony, does exceed 13.2 hands in height. Gray is the color, but all colors except piebald and skewbald are acceptable.

The third Welsh breed, the Welsh Pony of Cob Type (Section C), has had a slightly checkered history in modern times and after World War II there were just three stallions in existence. This breed is a stronger version of the Welsh Pony and is the result of crossing Mountain mares with the smaller trotting Cobs. Often called the farm pony, it did every job on the hill farms and was used to cart slate from the mines of North Wales to the seaports. In recent years their worth as a dual purpose pony has been realized and their numbers are increasing as is their use in competitive driving. This pony makes a splendid harness pony, is ideal for trail riding and a wonderful riding pony and hunter for young people or small adults.

The largest and strongest of the Welsh breed is the Welsh Cob (Section D). Any height over 13.2 hands is acceptable, but height is usually between 14.2 and 15.2 hands. In the Welsh cob, the color gray is rare, but they can be any color except piebald and skewbald. Blacks, bays, chestnuts and palominos abound and there are also creams and duns.

The Cobs have been exported to various countries, including Australia and New Zealand, and they and their blood via crosses are present in international competition, yet enormous popularity still remains with the smaller Welsh Mountain ponies and the Welsh ponies.

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Other site areas to read about Welsh breeds:

Welsh Pony and Cob (overview)
Welsh Mountain Pony
Welsh Cob

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